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University of New Brunswick


Size of company: Large (More than 500 employees)

Industry: Education, Training

  • Major double standard in how employees are treated. Went to human resources with a serious issue and they were useless. If you do not suck up to the right people you are in for a bumpy ride.
    There has been a big push in the last couple of years for "Healthy Active Living" but there is no concern for bigoted attitudes of employees in service departments or bullying within departments.

    Posted on 14 April 2009 by Rater #2 | Flag as inappropriate

    Was this review helpful? 9 0

Comments

I can't help but have a sneaky suspicion with regards to Rater1, Rater2, as well as the first two comments on these ratings. In fact I'd be willing to bet they were all written by the same person. Read all six entries and see what you think. Pay close attention to the writing style, grammar, punctuation, etc. They all look alike to me!

Posted on 12 December 2009

What I find ironic about this comment is that so many of the support staff themselves have incredibly poor grammar and syntax in their own speech and English is their first language. Having personally witnessed the lack of patience shown to students with poor English on several occasions, I can understand why this point would be so annoying to someone watching it happen over and over.

Posted on 26 May 2009

Too true. Incredibly insensitive staff in many service departments. This school actively courts international students but does not offer cultural sensitivity training to staff who can be EXTREMELY rude to students who do not have perfect english. I have watched eye-rolling, sighing and general ignorance too many times to count, as well as heard negative racial stereotypical comments being made. No one is ever reprimanded in regards to this behaviour. It is completely accepted. Apparently eating healthy and exercising is more important than being a tolerant person who respects differences among people.

Posted on 23 April 2009

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